How long does a sleeper-sleep?

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D.L.
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How long does a sleeper-sleep?

Post by D.L. » Wed May 23, 2007 4:57 pm

:?: Seeing these new ties going in on the MAW, I am wondering how long their useful lifespan is on the railroad, especially a shortline like the MAW? What timeline of usefullness should a railroad expect out of them? Probably their usefullness will outlast my lifetime.

OhioTom
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Post by OhioTom » Wed May 23, 2007 5:58 pm

On this same line, I have pulled out a few date nails (anyone remember them???) that are from 1948. The ties were rough, but still usable.

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D.L.
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Tin soldiers

Post by D.L. » Sun Jul 22, 2007 5:08 pm

The answer is forever on the new double tracked T.C. lead on the ole U.B. track. Nice to see the new rail laid down on top of those eternal steel ties. :lol:

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CIOR
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Post by CIOR » Sun Jul 22, 2007 8:44 pm

Those we call rust buckets.
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rrnut282
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Post by rrnut282 » Mon Jul 23, 2007 10:28 am

IIRC, a wood tie on a mainline has about a 25 year life. It then gets a "second life" on a siding or yard track where it spends the rest of its life. On a shortline, the rules are different. A tie lives until there is money to replace it or the rails sink into the dirt and they have to replace it. How long that takes depends upon many factors, tonnage, drainage, depth of creosote penetration, derailment damage, etc.
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Post by dbrackin7 » Tue Jul 24, 2007 1:06 pm

shortline ties that fits wabash central to a t or to a tie what ever you prefer :) The crossing is so bad in liberty center on old 303 that when the train goes through it cuts through roughly 2 inches of dirt. The train runs on faith, faith that it will stay on the tracks.
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Post by JW » Tue Jul 24, 2007 2:47 pm

We hyrail and motorcar the Dakota Southern out in South Dakota which was the Rapid City line of the Milwaukee. We pulled date nails on the mainline dating back to 1916. Granted the climate is dry but the ties are in better shape than those on the old Wabash or Cloverleaf.

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rrnut282
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Post by rrnut282 » Tue Jul 24, 2007 3:31 pm

I was taught, "water is the enemy". Rain, and poor drainage, bad (wet, acidic) soil, all contribute to cross-tie decay.
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Post by dbrackin7 » Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:52 pm

I know most shortlines are broke but how could you afford not to take care of the tracks, mowing trees is one thing but letting the ties turn to 1 inch splinters is another. I know at the moment wabash moves nothing hazardous but if they do how safe are the ties in place?
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dbrackin7
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Post by dbrackin7 » Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:54 pm

*mowing trees is refering to the brush cutter located next to the wabash central office, which now seems to be a static display like the caboose :shock:
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rrnut282
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Post by rrnut282 » Wed Jul 25, 2007 1:08 pm

You would be surprised at how few ties it takes. "Emergency Ties" is only ONE GOOD TIE per length (39ft) of rail. I much prefer 3-4 per rail, but what do I know?

It helps that exempted track is limited to 10MPH maximum.
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Post by dbrackin7 » Wed Jul 25, 2007 1:26 pm

that info is a little unsettling but im sure that someone has researched what the minimium safety margin is, I like the idea of 3-4 per rail too.
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