BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

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Notch 8
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BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Notch 8 » Wed Nov 25, 2020 6:45 am

A startup metal casting company has scaled back plans as it moves into an unused Bristol plant, but still intends to hire close to 300 workers.

The Bristol Indiana Corp., doing business as Brinco, bought the former Chassix facility at 51650 C.R. 133 Bristol Indiana and at mp 13 on the Grand Elk Railroad at this time there is no rail service but I could see this changing to either bring in scrap or to ship bolster's out.

For those who don't know anything about a bolster i've attached a photo and each car will sit on approximately 7000 lbs of poured steel.

This project started in 2019 and took a facility (Chassix) that had cast aluminum suspension parts for cars and trucks, this facility had sit empty for the last 6-7 years and a complete renovation has been underway turning this facility into a foundry that will pour steel into sand molds to produce side frames and the bolster for railcars.

They are trying to do some sample pours this year and going into the production mode sometime in 2021 i'm providing overhead cranes for the manufacturing and inspection process as well as the rigging devices to handle these castings.
Attachments
casting steel railway side frame and bolster for bogie _3.jpg
DSCN5006 (3).JPG

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rrnut282
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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by rrnut282 » Tue Dec 01, 2020 12:41 pm

Interesting that a new supplier is starting up in that market. PSR touts how fewer cars are needed as they turn faster. The only good thing going for them is timing as a glut of older cars time-out and need replaced. Normally attrition is somewhat balanced, but many were scrapped early thanks to the short-sightedness of PSR.
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Notch 8
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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Notch 8 » Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:25 pm

rrnut282 wrote:
Tue Dec 01, 2020 12:41 pm
Interesting that a new supplier is starting up in that market. PSR touts how fewer cars are needed as they turn faster. The only good thing going for them is timing as a glut of older cars time-out and need replaced. Normally attrition is somewhat balanced, but many were scrapped early thanks to the short-sightedness of PSR.
This is something that had been made in China now being sourced in NA and very automated

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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Hotbox » Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:53 pm

Notch 8 wrote:
Wed Nov 25, 2020 6:45 am
I could see this changing to either bring in scrap or to ship bolster's out.

I've always been a little fascinated with the way they can utilize scrap, which is bound to contain at least some impurities, and reuse it in demanding applications such as this., where the batches are small, compared to the production you would expect in a plant making huge batches at a time.

Organics will burn away, I'm sure. But some of the more exotic alloys, how would you refine unwanted trace metals completely out?

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Notch 8
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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Notch 8 » Wed Dec 02, 2020 6:08 am

Hotbox wrote:
Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:53 pm
Notch 8 wrote:
Wed Nov 25, 2020 6:45 am
I could see this changing to either bring in scrap or to ship bolster's out.

I've always been a little fascinated with the way they can utilize scrap, which is bound to contain at least some impurities, and reuse it in demanding applications such as this., where the batches are small, compared to the production you would expect in a plant making huge batches at a time.

Organics will burn away, I'm sure. But some of the more exotic alloys, how would you refine unwanted trace metals completely out?
I believe that it starts with the metals that you melt in the furnace, They are pouring steel and not cast iron. Porosity is the biggest issue in the Foundries that I go into.. I love Foundries !

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Notch 8
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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Notch 8 » Wed Dec 02, 2020 6:08 am

Hotbox wrote:
Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:53 pm
Notch 8 wrote:
Wed Nov 25, 2020 6:45 am
I could see this changing to either bring in scrap or to ship bolster's out.

I've always been a little fascinated with the way they can utilize scrap, which is bound to contain at least some impurities, and reuse it in demanding applications such as this., where the batches are small, compared to the production you would expect in a plant making huge batches at a time.

Organics will burn away, I'm sure. But some of the more exotic alloys, how would you refine unwanted trace metals completely out?
I believe that it starts with the metals that you melt in the furnace, They are pouring steel and not cast iron. Porosity is the biggest issue in the Foundries that I go into.. I love Foundries !

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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Hotbox » Wed Dec 02, 2020 4:19 pm

Well, it's great to hear about new industry coming into the region!! And being a rail related product is definitely a plus.

But I'm not sure we are talking about the same things, metalwise.

Look at the following:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alloy_ste ... al_science

Now, if Brinco will be sourcing it's steel from scrap, some of that scrap might have additive alloys to induce hardness, while others have additives to resist corrosion, or to enhance machinability.

Melting it all into one pot, how can they be sure the metal they eventually pour has the homogeneity to assure stress cracks won't be a problem later?

I guess I'm saying that when you are making your steel from scratch, you can have a pretty good idea what additives are going into it, so you can be sure what spec you are getting out of it.

But using recycled metals, how do you assure the hi specification needed for such critical uses?

I guess I always assumed that recycled metals were used mostly to make patio furniture, and what not. While safety-critical components required first batch type steel.

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Notch 8
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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Notch 8 » Wed Dec 02, 2020 8:25 pm

Hotbox wrote:
Wed Dec 02, 2020 4:19 pm
Well, it's great to hear about new industry coming into the region!! And being a rail related product is definitely a plus.

I guess I'm saying that when you are making your steel from scratch, you can have a pretty good idea what additives are going into it, so you can be sure what spec you are getting out of it.

But using recycled metals, how do you assure the hi specification needed for such critical uses?

I guess I always assumed that recycled metals were used mostly to make patio furniture, and what not. While safety-critical components required first batch type steel.
You do know everything that comes out of SDI and all the Nucor Mills is made from scrap metal ? Scrap is graded and sorted for the Customers needs so they have sort of idea what is being fed into the furnaces. Foundries and Steel Mills add alloys/pig iron to get to the composition that is needed.. we just keep using the same steel over and over.. requires less energy

When they charge/load the furnace they put different types scrap into the furnace..

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Post by Howard » Wed Dec 02, 2020 8:30 pm

For a time, I was involved with recycling aluminum for sale to GM for the production of engine blocks, not exactly the same, but very similar I'm sure.

They are not buying truckloads of mixed scrap like we might picture from Omnisource or other scrapyard. They buy ingots of metal that have been melted and chemically analyzed so they know just what mix they are getting. They know what chemistry they need. If it has too much of something, they do not buy it, or perhaps buy it to mix with another batch that has little of that.

The ingots might have come from scrapyard scrap, but more likely they come from the scrap from another controlled manufacturing operation--machining or casting, etc--so they know what went into the melt. The scrapyard melt is likely what went into the patio furniture.

Note that scrapyards do handle high quality scrap from other companies too, not just "junk".

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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Bob Durnell » Wed Dec 02, 2020 10:17 pm

Howard and Notch 8 are quite correct. There are various ways that scrap metal can be used to make high quality new products. One method of purifying the metal is shredding and sorting out certain metals like copper and aluminum from scrap autos, and by using only or mixing in "pure" sources of scrap like rejected castings, old clean cast items, the remains from stamping and shearing production and so on. Once the metal is charged into the furnace, certain processes can be done to "filter' out certain undesirable metals, or dilute it with virgin or more pure metal to reduce undesirable elements below the spec threshold. I have been a small scale collector and seller of scrap metals since the late 70's so I've studied the business a little, and have had the opportunity to read some utterly dull yet fascinating (to me) trade magazines.
If my opinions offend you, you should see the ones I keep to myself........

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Re: BRINCO - Bristol Indiana

Post by Hotbox » Thu Dec 03, 2020 12:32 pm

Yeah, I appreciate all you guys being patient with me. I guess I formed my opinion of "scrap metal" watching that Lincoln get recycled in the movie Goldfinger. :mrgreen:

Hadn't really thought about scrap sourced from other manufacturing processes. Makes sense.

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